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Collective Bargaining Agreement Negotiations 2021

 

With the recent victory of the pay reduction plan being rescinded, and given that the financial outlook for state appropriations looks good (though still uncertain), the Executive Council of United Academics has agreed with the university to pause bargaining until this summer. At that point we’ll have a better idea of enrollment and know state appropriation numbers. It will also give us an opportunity to partner with the university in securing those financial resources from the state and recruiting a large, diverse student body. We hope this, in turn, will allow the administration more of a sense of financial security so they can provide a better economic package and respond positively to some of our bargaining planks that require investment of resources.

We also know that everyone is tired right now. United Academics relies on the energy and enthusiasm of our members to move bargaining forward. An educated, engaged membership leads to a better contract. And, we recognize that everybody (us included)  is “zoomed out.” We expect to be back in person in the fall. We suspect we will be able to bargain at least mostly in person this summer. We think the physical bargaining table is a better place to share ideas, and we are willing to take a couple months pause to be able to share physical space and collaborate with the administration on the new CBA.

A Summary of our Summer 2020 Agreement with the Administration

FTE fully restored: All Career faculty who received renewal notices in May with lowered FTE will have their FTE restored to the same FTE they held in AY19-20. All Career faculty who were issued new contracts due to receiving a promotion will have their FTE restored to the FTE they held in AY19-20.

Withdrawn promotions: Career faculty who had their promotion submitted to the Provost but withdrew their file can opt to have their file reviewed by the Provost as if it had not been withdrawn. The review should be complete before the start of the academic year.

Reduced amount of salary cut: The agreed-upon employee salary cut is up to $20M over one year. In April, the administration’s proposal called for up to $100M in employee salary cuts over four years.

Threshold: The Agreement calls for the administration to mitigate the first $15 million of any losses and any losses over $35 million. Employee salary cuts will mitigate losses between $15 million and $35 million. The administration’s April PPR called for all losses to be addressed immediately through salary cuts.

Lowered the rates for the lowest earners: The chart below calculates the effective salary cut for employees at selected base salary levels with a comparison to the comparable rates in the April PPR plan. Cuts do not impact stipends, awards, or overloads.

Percentage cut for salaries of the Tentative Agreement vs. the Administration’s April PPR.
Our plan is for one year; theirs was for up to four.

Although we were not able to bargain for a higher tier, we were able to raise the amount of the cut on those earning more than $200,000 from an April 16% rate to 18% rate. The money from this increase was used to raise the floor of the cuts from $30K in the administration’s April proposal to $45K in the Agreement.

Delayed implementation: There are two possible times that the salary cut plan could be triggered. If the university experiences a tuition deficit and/or a cut in state funding in November greater than $15 million, the administration could trigger wage cuts to save enough to make up for a decrease in revenue between $15 million and $35 million.

It is more likely that the salary cut plan will be triggered next summer. The administration can wait until summer 2021 and trigger the salary cut plan by combining losses due to tuition revenue decreases, cuts to promised state support, and state support in the 2021-23 biennium budget.

The salary cut plan can only be triggered once and there can be no more than 12 months of salary cuts.

Research faculty exempt: Because their salary derives mostly from grants, research assistants, research associates, research professors, and post docs will be exempt from the wage cut plan. This is unchanged from the administration’s PPR plan.

The details of the above summaries will be sent to all members of the union shortly, along with information on the ratification vote.

Expectation of Continued Employment

The bargaining teams also agreed to the basis of a new system for employing non-funding contingent instructional Career faculty. We believe this will be a much better system, but there are many details to work out, as it will impact several articles in the Collective Bargaining Agreement. Below is a summary of the key points. More information will be shared as we work on the details.

Though we have more work to do to complete the full contract bargaining we began in January, and though our current circumstances have complicated all of these processes, we believe the agreement we have reached is a good one. The bargaining team, again, appreciates all the support we have received. Without member support and participation, we would not have been able to sustain our energy and determination through this unusual time, and we would not have reached such a favorable agreement.

Expectation of Continued Employment

No more contracts and renewals: The current system of one-, two-, and three-year contracts is vastly better than having no job security at all. We have, however, run into some fairly significant problems. As Deans ordered cuts, departments and units were forced to choose among the faculty who happened to be up for renewal. This led to situations where only faculty who had achieved promotion could be non-renewed, which was not always ideal. We also saw an increase in contracts that offered low FTE in the second and third years of contracts – 1.0, 0.1, 0.1 contracts. And, of course, we had the events of this spring, a disaster we cannot allow to be repeated.

The system described below would address many of these issues and only applies to non-funding contingent Career faculty. It will not be perfect, and it will not guarantee that a Career faculty member can never lose their job, but we believe that this will be a much better system with stronger protections than our current one.

Expectation and rationale: Non-funding contingent Career faculty will have the expectation of continued employment that can only be ended for legitimate financial, academic, or performance reasons after the first year of employment. Career faculty in their first year can be laid off for any reason.

Notice: Career faculty in their first year can be laid off with 30 days’ notice. Faculty in their second year, but who have not achieved promotion can be laid off with 90 days’ notice. Faculty who have achieved promotion must be given 12 months’ notice before the layoff goes into effect.

Earned seniority: Layoffs are based on the functions and skills required to perform necessary work, but layoffs will generally follow earned seniority. This means that Career faculty who have not earned promotion will be laid off before Senior I faculty and Senior I before Senior II.

Expedited arbitration: Faculty who have received a layoff notice will be able to challenge the legitimacy of the layoff through an expedited binding arbitration process. The goal will be to have the layoff notice formally reviewed before it goes into effect. This system will replace the current grievance-arbitration system that can take several months to complete.

FTE maintenance: Assigned FTE cannot go down, except by mutual agreement between the faculty member and university.

Rehire at same FTE: While we have not worked out a complete recall system, we have agreed that faculty members hired back by the university into the same category – instructor, research assistant, research associate, lecturer, librarian, etc. – cannot be hired at a lower FTE than what they held before they were laid off.

Meet the Team Bargaining the Details

David Cecil

Executive Director

David Cecil has worked in the labor movement for the last 15 years, most of those years with the Graduate Teaching Fellows Federation. Before his union career, he attended graduate school here at the UO, earning a MA in History, before discovering that he loved bargaining contracts more than he loved 19th-cenutry American medical-legal history. He does love bargaining contracts.

He currently serves on the Board of Advisors of the National Center for the Study of Collective Bargaining in Higher Education.

In his spare time, he drinks beer on the patio with his wife, tends to his blossoming record collection, and sleeps.

 

Email Dave

Scott Pratt

Executive Vice President

Scott Pratt is a professor in the Department of Philosophy. His research and teaching interests are in American philosophy (including pragmatism, America feminism, philosophies of race, and Native American philosophy), philosophy of education, and the history of logic. 

He was a member of the United Academics Organizing Committee when the union was formed and a member of the first UA bargaining team (as well as the second and third).

He has served in a variety of administrative roles including department head, humanities dean in CAS, Dean of the Graduate School, and Executive Vice Provost.

He sees faculty unions as a necessary part of shared governance in the present world of corporate higher education and an essential part of keeping the University of Oregon’s focus on its academic mission.

Email Scott

Kate Thornhill

Libraries Steward

Kate serves as the Digital Research, Education, and Media (DREAM) Lab’s operations manager where she coordinates staffing, lab scheduling and usage, and DREAM Lab technology instruction. She is also responsible for the project management of Digital Scholarship Center digital projects and leads Oregon Digital service management.

Our Current Collective Bargaining Agreement

2018-2021 CBA

The Collective Bargaining Agreement is the contract between the University of Oregon and United Academics. This version of the CBA is the most up-to-date version, incorporating several Memoranda of Understanding and copy-edited through a mutual process. This agreement was extended to June 2021 through an MOU signed the spring 2020.

Have a question about the CBA?

Ask the person who bargained it!

David Cecil

Executive Director

David Cecil has worked in the labor movement for the last 15 years, most of those years with the Graduate Teaching Fellows Federation. Before his union career, he attended graduate school here at the UO, earning a MA in History, before discovering that he loved bargaining contracts more than he loved 19th-cenutry American medical-legal history. He does love bargaining contracts.

He currently serves on the Board of Advisors of the National Center for the Study of Collective Bargaining in Higher Education.

In his spare time, he drinks beer on the patio with his wife, tends to his blossoming record collection, and sleeps.

 

Email Dave