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Intro from Avinnash

When it comes to Oregon politics, our state affiliates hire lobbyist and we maintain close connections with the UO government relations team. We stay informed on legislation that affects higher education in Oregon.

Meet the Chair of the Politics Committee

Avinnash Tiwari

Chair of the Politics Committee

Avinnash Tiwari is an Instructor in English and Composition and currently serves as the Acting Director of the Black Studies Program and Minor. As Politics Chair for UAUO, VP of Political Action for AAUP-OR, and a member of AAUP National’s government relations committee, Avinnash’s commitment will always be first and foremost to students, especially students marginalized from (higher) education.

In order to make freedom dreams for higher education a reality, Avinnash works on securing funding for our University, protecting Academic freedom, advocating for faculty voices in state and institution decision-making, developing strong relationships with our State legislators, Labor comrades, and other government relations constituents, and holding the State and its higher ed institutions accountable to their student-centered mission.

Avinnash does this knowing full well when it comes to power writ large, the more things change the more they stay the same. He is, however, grateful for the students and young people who continually challenge him to fight for something different when it comes to both our Political and political lives here at the UO. 

Email Avinnash

Ongoing Work and Issues

Funding Overview

How UO gets its money from the state.

HECC & Governance

The Higher Education Coordinating Committee oversees public higher education in Oregon. Learn what they do.

Friends in the legislature

We talk with legislators regularly, especially the Eugene/Springfield delegation. Meet them here.

PERS

The Public Education Retirement System is an evergreen legislative topic. Read what’s happening now.

Racism & Policing

UA has expertise on racism and policing and engages with state and national leaders on these issues. 

Local and State Endorsements

The Politics Committee meets to discuss political issues affecting the state. The committee also makes recommendations for endorsements to the Executive Council. The Executive Council makes endorsements on behalf of the full membership of United Academics.

Click on a candidate name to see their completed candidate survey. Candidates for office can fill out the survey here. United Academics reserves the right to not post all the responses we receive.

Laurie Trieger, Lane County Commissioner, Seat 3

NAME: Laurie Trieger
CANDIDACY: Lane County Board of Commissioners
Office: District 3
Candidate comm # or PAC #19844
Campaign mailing address: Elect Laurie Trieger c/o 245 Sunnyside Dr. Eugene, OR, 97404 (Treasurer) Campaign phone: 541-868-7924
Email: ElectLaurie2020@gmail.com
Date received:

HIGHER ED

Please describe your views and position on funding or support for higher education,
Including, but not limited to, State funding, tuition rates, University accountability, etc.,
The University of Oregon receives $70 million per year from the State Legislature as well as millions in private funds to the University Foundation, yet always seems to come up short. Ensuring that the University is adequately and properly funded will help reign in tuition increases, allow for program expansion instead of cuts, and help with staff retention. As a County Commissioner and a community leader, I would advocate for an increased level of transparency with the University’s budget process overall and with money received from private donors in particular. I was glad to see the Legislature pass the Student Success Act in the 2018/2019 session and would be a strong supporter of a similar bill to shore up quality and access to higher education. No one should be priced out of an education. We must also ensure staff– at every level and across departments– are being treated well; with good benefits, fair wages, and job security. Having productive, professional, respected university staff is a critical component of students’ educational experience.

Please describe your views and position on state transparency, especially in relation to
University foundations that (are meant to) serve the interests of the State and its people.
University Foundations are meant to benefit our state and university students. Too often large contributions are made to the foundation with very little transparency or accountability as to what the money is being used for. Too often the University claims to not have enough money and responds by making big cuts to high performing programs that represent a tiny fraction of the institution’s overall budget. Cuts to the Labor Education Research Center (LERC) is a particularly glaring example of this. Publicly celebrated for its quality research, advocacy for workers, and public policy analysis, LERC is threatened with devastating cuts that would undermine its ability to continue to deliver these very services, trainings, and reports for which University representatives offer high praise. Additionally, there have been several issues over the years involving threatened and actual layoffs of classified staff; as well as policies that amount to pay cuts through inadequate benefits or COLAs. In 2014 and 2015, as the manager of the successful city-wide paid sick time campaign, and a key organizer in the passage of the

statewide sick time policy, I stood with the GTFF and others in support of University employees having access to this same basic worker right. As a County Commissioner, I would advocate for increased transparency specifically when the University receives large amounts of money, with a clear and easy reporting system that also identifies where money comes from and how it is being spent. Additionally, whenever possible, I would advocate moving funds into investments in staff, the first line of service providers in the University.

UNION RIGHTS

Do you support the right of employees to collectively bargain?

Yes. I have and will always support workers right to collectively bargain.

Would you oppose efforts to eliminate or restrict the right of workers and their unions to represent all workers or use payroll-deduction for union dues, including publicly
opposing ballot measures?
Yes. The right to have a seat at the table and collectively bargain is a fundamental right that must be protected. Policy like the PERS bill in the most recent legislative session is unacceptable. We cannot balance budgets on the backs of workers. Before my career in the nonprofit sector, I spent many years waiting tables, working in retail, and cleaning office buildings at night when my children were young. I know how hard it can be to make ends meet while trying to raise a family. I am committed to protecting workers and their rights to bargain for health insurance, humane paid leave policies, fair wages, pay equity, and the benefits and protections that they deserve.

How likely are you to publicly oppose measures, as indicated above, that are deemed to
be hostile to organized labor?
I am committed to publicly opposing and working against measures deemed hostile against organized labor. I am proud to have been a leader of the coalition that helped pass several protective bills for workers; including paid sick leave, retirement security, pay equity, protection and recourse from wage theft, as well as the Ban the Box Campaign and anti-profiling laws. I have committed much of my career working in coalition to protect workers and their right to organize and will continue to do so as a county commissioner.

What are some of the ways you imagine pushing back on the continued effort to weaken Union strength (State legislation following Janus v. AFSCME; attempt to gut
LERC; etc.,)?
The Janus decision, as well as the attempt to gut LERC, was extremely disappointing to me. LERC specifically is a very important program both for its pro-labor trainings and research expertise. I spent a morning on the picket line with AFSCME workers from Lane County when they struck in 2017.

The University of Oregon and Lane County government are two of the top ten largest employers in the county and I believe both entities have an opportunity and a responsibility to be model employers to yield a stable, well-supported workforce. We have to look to the workforce and workplace of the future; this includes things like offering flexible scheduling, telecommuting options, alternative transit incentives, child care supports and more. As a County Commissioner my door will be open to union members, department heads, leaders and organizers so that we can learn from one another in service to strengthening unions.

LOCAL ISSUES

What is your position (and any plans) on addressing the Eugene/Springfield housing
situation?
I recognize and feel the urgency in Lane County’s housing crisis. We are not building the quality, affordable housing for those already here wishing to stay, or for newcomers to our community. As a consequence many local businesses struggle to find and keep skilled workers, which decreases potential for economic growth and development. We must streamline permitting processes and continue to work across sectors to solve barriers such as limits to buildable land and zoning restrictions. Before we expand outward, we must make the most of the land within our existing urban growth boundary; building up instead of out. With half of Eugene’s housed people being renters, fostering strong and positive working relationships between tenants and landlords is another critical area for improvement to stabilize housing in our community. Lastly, when planning and building new neighborhoods, we must ensure that they are safe, walk- and bike-able, and have easy access to essential services including health care facilities, grocery stores, parks, schools, and public transit.

Our area has seen an uptick in “hate crimes” and related activities. How would you work
towards addressing these issues?
It is critical for elected officials, as leaders, to stand up against hate in our community. Eugene and its surroundings have a serious problem with hate related crimes as well as with organized hate groups fomenting bigotry, xenophobia, sexism, and racism. We must ensure public safety officers are properly trained to handle and investigate these situations, to ensure they are not part of the problem but part of the solution. This means prioritizing de-escalation, among other training needs. We need to partner with schools and implement programs to meet these challenges head on, with young people, as they find their way in the world and establish peer relationships. As a community leader and organizer I have never shied away from calling out racial bias, gender inequality, and other forms of oppression, whether it manifests locally or nationally. As a County Commissioner I would have an even further reaching platform from which to advocate for both the policy and culture change needed to ensure all people are treated with dignity and respect, and are free from violence, oppression, and discrimination.

How do you plan on addressing issues around poverty and homelessness in our area?

Our homelessness crisis and the high levels of poverty in our area are the result of many local, regional, and national factors. High on the list is the housing crisis (lack of affordability, quality, and inventory). Federal policies such as changes to programs like SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program or “food stamps”) further erode the ability of families to make ends meet. We need to push back on these policies while also working to mitigate the impacts of them in the meantime. Import and export policy along with moves to outsource jobs and systematically gut the power of organized labor here at home is resulting in more low-wage, service industry jobs with little to no room for advancement or worker protections.

The number one goal for the County should be to ensure that we are providing the support folks need, including historically (and dangerously) underfunded addiction treatment programs and behavioral health services. We need to help people build skills and find meaningful employment while also providing supports for those unable to work. We need to stabilize people in long term housing, build more ADU’s

and affordable apartment complexes, as well as build more starter homes so that those on the path to home ownership can take advantage of historically low interest rates. The board of county commissioners is also the county’s housing authority and so as a commissioner I would work to maximize our effectiveness in leveraging state and federal dollars to build (subsidized) housing for low income residents while also working to streamline systems for issuing building permits for private developers. I want county and city officials to continue working together to solve this issue.

We can also tackle poverty and under-employment through significant economic development programs and projects, elevating industries that bring living wage jobs to the community and do not harm the environment.

CAMPAIGN QUESTIONS

Are there choices or decisions you have made in the past that we should be aware of in making our recommendation to support your candidacy?
I stand by my work both as a career nonprofit professional, and as an active community advocate and volunteer. My goals have always been to increase access to power for “regular folks” and to further equity and fairness, especially for women and working people. I am happy to discuss this more an in person meeting.

What are your three primary goals while serving in this position, both short term and longer term?

Improving health outcomes and reducing health disparities (this involves stable housing, adequate health care delivery, equitable educational opportunities, and more).

Building a robust, forward-thinking (local) economy and strengthening our workforce (focusing particularly on the region’s growing tech sector and our unique food and beverage industry innovators and entrepreneurs).

Protecting and preserving natural resources and mitigating the impacts of climate change.

How will those goals and your plans while in office benefit Higher Ed organized labor as
well as the students we serve?
By creating a more labor-friendly climate and culture overall, as well as a more welcoming and thriving community for faculty, staff and students to live in. Additionally, many UO staff have spouses who may need non-academic employment, and/or have children enrolled in schools in Eugene, so it’s critical that the community as a whole be a safe, welcoming place for everyone to live, work, and play.

Why did you decide to run for this position?

Over the last 33 years, I’ve laid down deep roots here in Eugene, raised two kids and am now watching my grandsons grow up in this community I love. For decades I’ve been working professionally and as an active volunteer to deliver critical human services, as well as organizing and advocating with and for some of our most marginalized and least resourced neighbors. I served a three year term on the county Budget Committee and currently serve on the county’s Equity and Access Advisory Board. The county is, fundamentally, a service provider; delivering behavioral health services, running medical clinics,managing parks, roads, and bridges, public safety programs, local elections, and more. I’m excited to

bring all that I’ve learned through my years of grassroots organizing, my policy analysis and advocacy skills, plus my personal, lived experience to the role of county commissioner.

This will be an open seat for the first time in 24 years; Pete Sorenson announced he won’t be running again. To the best of my research, if I’m elected, it will be the first time a woman has represented the district in nearly 50 years, if ever.

What other organizations are supporting your candidacy?

Currently, my campaign is endorsed by nearly two dozen elected officials including Mayor Lucy Vinis, State Representatives Julie Fahey and Marty Wilde; Lane Community College Board Members Lisa Fragala, Angela VanKrause, and Chelsea Jennings; 4J School Board Members Mary Walston and Martina Shabram; as well as over 40 community leaders and activists (see www.laurietrieger.com/endorsements).

What is your plan to win your election?

To ensure a victory in May, my campaign is executing a robust field, fundraising, communications, and endorsement plan. We aim to raise $75,000 to $100,000, depending on how many people file for the seat. Our goal is to knock 20,000 doors which is 5,000 over the number of knockable doors in my district. Money raised will go toward hiring staff, sending out direct mail to voters, radio and potentially tv ads as well as executing an aggressive Get Out the Vote Plan during the last 4-6 weeks of the campaign. I look forward to giving you an update on progress toward these goals in person.

What would UAUO’s endorsement mean to you?

That I am a trusted voice for supporting working people, a voice for labor; as well as that I have a grasp of and respect for the value of quality education and its impact on the health of the community over all. It would mean that I have demonstrated a commitment to representingand to serving– our community. And I would hope that it would mean your members would be advocates and ambassadors for my campaign, helping to get the word out about my candidacy and maybe volunteering to help, too. Finally, I like to think it would mean that we have a relationship that will extend beyond the campaign season and that I can call on representatives and members of United Academics for insights and perspective to inform my decision making as your commissioner.

Lucy Vinis, City of Eugene Mayor

Name: Lucy Vinis

Candidacy: Mayor
Name of Office: Mayor of Eugene
Candidate comm # or PAC #: 17466
Campaign Mailing Address: PO Box 806 Eugene, OR, 97440 Campaign Phone: 541-600-4462
Email:
info@lucyvinis.com
Date Received: 10/21/19

HIGHER ED
Please describe your views and position on funding or support for higher education, including, but not limited to, State funding, tuition rates, University accountability, etc.,
The percentage of public funds supporting the University of Oregon has dropped dramatically in recent years. The resulting reliance on private support and steadily increasing tuition jeopardize the University’s mandate to provide an affordable public education to Oregon’s students. Additionally, these private funds are often earmarked for special projects or shift priorities based on available support, leaving valuable programs such as LERC without adequate budgets. As Mayor, I am an advocate for increasing the state funding to ensure that the University is able to fulfill its mandate both as a public university and as an affordable option for higher education.

Please describe your views and position on state transparency, especially in relation to University foundations that (are meant to) serve the interests of the State and its people.
Transparency in the source and use of public dollars is essential. At the same time, the increasing reliance on private support benefits programs that are able to attract private funding and increases pressure on programs to raise private dollars. We have seen this in the proposed cuts to LERC — its value is measured in its capacity to fund itself rather than to provide valuable educational experiences. Without stronger state funding, this will not change. To the extent possible, however, the University should be held to the highest standard of accountability and transparency. Students, parents, alumni and

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community members deserve to know the source of funding, and how and why funding decisions are made.

UNION RIGHTS
Do you support the rights of employees to collectively bargain?
As Mayor, I have stood clearly on the side of supporting the union’s ability to represent their membership in collective bargaining. I am committed to using my role as mayor to encourage both sides in bargaining to stay at the table and that is a role. I personally called President Schill to encourage resolution with the GTFF last month.

I grew up in a union family. My parents were both journalists and members of the Newspaper Guild. Twice in my childhood, my family coped with the impact of strikes. When the printers at The New York Times went on strike, my father, who worked on the editorial side, refused to cross the picket line. He was out of work once for about three months and the second time for close to six months.

Would you oppose efforts to eliminate or restrict the right of workers and their unions to represent all workers or use payroll-deduction for union dues, including publicly opposing ballot measures?
I am not in favor of reducing benefits for current or future employees. My starting assumption is that current benefits are essential to the well-being of employees and I would not be in favor of a reduction or an effort to balance the budget on the backs of employees. Proposed changes would be a key component of future bargaining and I would turn to the union to understand the implications and ramifications of any proposed adjustments.

How likely are you to publicly oppose measures, as indicated above, that are deemed to be hostile to organized labor?
I am fully committed both as a community member and as an elected official to opposing measures that are deemed to be hostile toward organized labor.

What are some of the ways you imagine pushing back on the continued effort to weaken Union strength (State legislation following Janus v. AFSCME; attempt to gut LERC; etc.,)?
The Janus v. AFSCME decision as well as the University of Oregon’s recent attempt to drastically reduce support for LERC were disappointing and undermined the value that unions have in our communities. I believe in the importance of organized labor to ensure safe, fair, consistent, predictable working conditions. The LERC program cuts and the recent GTFF negotiation process indicate a lack of respect by the University for the importance and value of unions.. As an elected

official, I will champion all workers rights to collectively bargain and will speak out against efforts to weaken our unions.

LOCAL ISSUES
What is your position (and any plans) on addressing the Eugene/Springfield housing situation?
Eugene has a housing crisis. I know from my experience at ShelterCare that too many families in our community are a single medical bill or car repair away from homelessness. Increasing the availability and affordability of housing is a key concern of city council. As Mayor, I advocated for and passed the Construction Excise Tax, for the first time reaching across the divide between the business/development community and housing and neighborhood activists to create a housing trust fund to support the construction of more housing people can afford. I also championed the work of the Housing Tools and Strategies workshops to identify and recommend priorities within 80 possible tactics the city could target to remove barriers to building more housing. Looking forward, I am eager to see the construction of our new riverfront development which will contain new affordable and missing middle housing options for people as well as create a new opportunity for economic development. We are struggling to adapt to the challenges of growing from a large town into a small city. This is evidenced in the immediate struggles to adjust our neighborhood zoning, remove barriers in building Accessory Dwelling Units (ADUs) and responding to the requirements of HB 2001 to open residential neighborhoods to more duplexes, fourplexes and apartment buildings. I will continue to advocate for the City to comply with the law and help remove barriers for ADUs and encourage the creation of more “missing middle” housing to address our housing crisis.

Our area has seen an uptick in “hate crimes” and related activities. How would you work towards addressing these issues?
I am committed to standing up to hate crimes in our community. As Mayor, I am proud to have chaired the Ad Hoc Committee on our sanctuary city ordinance and continue to champion the rights of our immigrant communities to be safe, welcomed and encouraged to be active members of our community. Further, for the first time, the city engaged an Equity Panel to engage communities of color who are not broadly or often represented in our policy discussions to reflect on climate impacts in their lives. Those conversations are a model and lead to broader conversations, not just about climate change, but about authentic and diverse representation.

How do you plan on addressing issues around poverty and homelessness in our area?

I took office in 2016 promising to work toward the creation of a permanent public shelter with the understanding that the city would partner closely with the county. My initial stakeholder meetings primed the county and city to commit to the shelter feasibility study and service assessment, now known as the TAC report. Those 10 recommendations, adopted by both the county board and city council, put us in a stronger partnership and shared investment than ever before to make strategic, targeted investments to help more people in our community stabilize their lives. I am committed to ensuring we fund the TAC report to bring those recommendations to fruition. We still have a lot of work to do on this front but I am committed to having those hard conversations about how we make progress toward our goal of reducing homelessness in Eugene.

CAMPAIGN QUESTIONS
Are there choices or decisions you have made in the past that we should be aware of in making our recommendation to support your candidacy?
As Mayor, I have put a strong emphasis on trying to combat hate crimes and protecting our workers in Eugene. Through the Kindness Campaign that I announced on November 3rd, I intend to shine a light on the communities within our community to increase a sense of belonging. Kindness is an action — and one of our most important recent actions is engagement of the Equity Panel in our Climate Action Plan 2.0 to bring the concerns and priorities of communities of color and lower income residents into our resiliency planning. I am also committed to standing with workers. I supported the GTFF this fall with a personal call to President Schill to advocate for a fair resolution for workers — my constituents — who need to be able to pay their rent, raise their families, and be assured of health care.

What are your three primary goals while serving in this position, both short term and longer term?
I look forward to continuing the work I have begin in my first term. Climate change, housing, homelessness and equitable economic development are critical concerns. Emergency preparedness will continue to be a priority. Our fierce winter storms and vulnerability to wildfire require outreach to the community to learn to be prepared; and engagement with our neighboring jurisdictions to work together. Finally, I expect to incorporate the constructive dialogue, actions and framework of the Kindness Campaign to infuse all of my work to bring the community together.

How will those goals and your plans while in office benefit Higher Ed organized labor as well as the students we serve?
The University of Oregon brings undergraduates and graduate students, professors and staff from around the country and world to Eugene. Collectively, they represent an

abundant and diverse resource of talent, skills and perspectives. We can learn a lot from each other. As Mayor, I want to build a community that welcomes students and offers an economy and housing market that enables them to live and thrive. Together, the City and UAUO form a partnership that moves our entire city forward.

Why did you decide to run for this position?

I have decided to seek re-election because I want to continue to make progress on the issues that matter to me and to our city. We are poised to grow and prosper, but we also face deep challenges in climate change, homelessness, housing and social justice. I am eager to translate what I have learned in these first three years into greater progress in a second term.

What other organizations are supporting your candidacy?

Currently, my campaign is endorsed by several elected officials including former Mayor Kitty Piercy and Labor Commissioner Val Hoyle, as well as the Eugene Realtors Association.

What is your plan to win your election?

In order to win my election in May, my campaign has prepared and is executing a robust field, fundraising, endorsements and social media plan. We aim to raise between $90,000 and $100,000. Our goal is to knock 20,000 doors and donations will go toward staff, sending out direct mail, radio, digital and potentially TV ads as well as a Get Out the Vote Plan during the last leg of the race.

What would UAUO’s endorsement mean to you?

An endorsement from UAUO would reassure me of an ongoing partnership between the City and UAUO. I recognize the benefit that our City has from the University of Oregon by training the next generation and I am also committed to fairness in the workplace. I see a strong relationship of UAUO’s commitment to the University’s faculty, as my constituents and as contributors to our community through educating our students .

Randy Groves, Eugene City Council, Ward 8

NAME CANDIDACY
Office: Eugene City Council, Ward 8

Candidate comm # or PAC #: Randy Groves for Eugene, PAC 20155

Campaign mailing address Campaign phone: 1-720-998-6143 (Sean Shivers, Campaign Manager); 541-915-5259 (Randy Groves)
3208 Blacktail Drive
Eugene, OR 97405

Email: seanrshivers@gmail.com chief.06596@gmail.com Date received: 02/20/2020

HIGHER ED

Please describe your views and position on funding or support for higher education, including, but not limited to, State funding, tuition rates, University accountability, etc., Please describe your views and position on state transparency, especially in relation to University foundations that (are meant to) serve the interests of the State and its people.

I support higher education. I hold a B.S. in Planning, Public Policy and Management from the University of Oregon. My wife and I are currently supporting our two children in college and are acutely aware of the cost of tuition, books and materials, and housing. I support fixed tuition rates so that our students have more predictability in planning their higher education pursuits. I also support efforts by the state to control, and preferably bring down the cost of tuition. Our universities need to be accountable for their expenditures and tuition increases and I support transparency in our university foundations.

Unfortunately, while I am supportive of these ideals, as a city councilor I will have no legislative authority over these issues.

UNION RIGHTS
Do you support the right of employees to collectively bargain? Yes

Would you oppose efforts to eliminate or restrict the right of workers and their unions to represent all workers or use payroll-deduction for union dues, including publicly opposing ballot measures? Yes

How likely are you to publicly oppose measures, as indicated above, that are deemed to be hostile to organized labor? I have been an IAFF Local 851 labor leader in the

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past and I continued to be a supporter of labor as Fire Chief. I will publicly oppose measures designed to limit or restrict workers’ rights.

What are some of the ways you imagine pushing back on the continued effort to weaken Union strength (State legislation following Janus v. AFSCME; attempt to gut LERC; etc.,)? I am willing to make public statements and contact our state representatives to advocate for labor. I opposed right-to-work legislation and I have been a participant and beneficiary of the LERC program.

LOCAL ISSUES

What is your position (and any plans) on addressing the Eugene/Springfield housing situation? With a 2.9% rental vacancy rate, (less than half the national average) we have a housing crisis in Eugene where the cost of rent and housing prices are out pacing wage growth. Wages have increased by about 14% since 2010, at the same time the median rental rate has increased by 47%, and the median home value has increased by 130%. We have a growing population that is experiencing housing cost stress. I will come at this problem from two directions, increasing our inventory and diversity of our housing stock while working to combat wage stagnation. To accomplish this, I will work to increase housing density in our downtown, mixed use and more dense housing along our transit corridors, and more density in our detached single-residential neighborhoods as provided for in HB2001. I will also work to enact policies that encourage the development of more housing through a number of different strategies including incentives and seeking out responsible developers who can enact a vision supporting the ideals discussed above.

Our area has seen an uptick in “hate crimes” and related activities. How would you work towards addressing these issues? The solution starts with a strong advocacy for embracing our differences, and education on hate crimes occurring within our community. It’s important for both elected and appointed officials to make clear that they stand with the folks being targeted by this kind of violence; including different organizations that advocate for under-represented groups such as the NAACP and Centro Latino Americano.

Finally, it ends with a strong no tolerance policy for hate crimes, and includes policy direction for our police force that sets expectations for both proactive and reactive response to problems that occur.

How do you plan on addressing issues around poverty and homelessness in our area?

I will work to continue improving and diversifying our economy and producing more living wage jobs. It should be noted that although statistically we are experiencing low unemployment, we have high underemployment making it difficult for our lower wage earners to survive. For addressing our homelessness issue, the City of Eugene and Lane County jointly commissioned a study on

homelessness which resulted in the development of the Technical Assistance Collaborative (TAC) Report. This report provides us with a roadmap to follow and solutions to enact that will help us address our homelessness problem. Some of the recommendations included in the report are already being implemented. I want to see us continue this effort and work to phase in implementation of the remaining recommendations as we identify resources support the effort.

CAMPAIGN QUESTIONS

Are there choices or decisions you have made in the past that we should be aware of in making our recommendation to support your candidacy? I am the former Eugene Springfield Fire Chief who retired in 2016 after more than 36 years of service. I currently serve on the City of Eugene’s Budget Committee. Over the course of my professional career, I have made many decisions, but I can think of none that would negatively impact your decision to support my candidacy. My behavior has been very consistent throughout my career and personal life.

What are your three primary goals while serving in this position, both short term and longer term? Increasing the inventory and diversity of our housing to improve affordability. Working to address our homelessness issue. Improve our Economy and Jobs with an emphasis supporting labor including the Community Benefit Framework concept, and creating more living wage jobs.

How will those goals and your plans while in office benefit Higher Ed organized labor as well as the students we serve? Supporting labor and working to address wage stagnation will help support those who work in higher education. Increasing the inventory and diversity of our housing stock to make housing more affordable, will again help those working in higher education as well as students who live off campus and attend our local institutions of higher education. Finally, working to address our homelessness issue will not only help those experiencing homelessness, but help improve the quality of our neighborhoods surrounding our higher education campuses.

Why did you decide to run for this position? I have been in public service my entire adult life and after retiring and having our children leave home, I sought to again become involved in government by applying to serve on our Eugene’s Budget Committee. When I met with my City Councilor, Chris Pryor, he informed me that he would not be seeking reelection when his term expired after serving four terms in office. After speaking with Chris, my family and a number of people in our community, I decided to run for the Ward 8 seat. I have lived in Ward 8 since 1983, I have been involved in our community, and my spouse and I both volunteered in the schools. I was also a Churchill Area Babe Ruth baseball coach and board member for about six years.

What other organizations are supporting your candidacy? I have endorsements from the Lane County Labor Council, Lane Professional Firefighters Local 851, IBEW Local 280, Eugene Police Employees Association, as well as individuals such as State Labor Commissioner Val Hoyle, the Ward 8 incumbent Councilor Chris Pryor (not seeking reelection), Lane County Commissioner Heather Buch, and three 4j School Board members and one past board member to name a few. I am also in the process of seeking further labor endorsements after receiving the Lane County Labor Council endorsement. For a complete listing, see my web site at www.randygroves.org

What is your plan to win your election? Market my experience and track record of success working within the same system I am seeking elective office in. I have served as a line firefighter, union representative, captain, shift supervisor, Deputy Chief over Operations (division manager), and Chief of Department (executive manager). I set the vision and led the merger between the Eugene and Springfield fire departments which resulted in saving money and improving service while retaining all of our firefighters. I served as an executive manager and was at the helm of our fire department throughout the Great Recession, and actually improved our service in a number of areas during this time of scarcity.

I am working hard to raise money, I have a goal of knocking on every door in Ward 8, I am connecting with voters individually and in groups, I am seeking endorsements from people and organizations that represent my values, and I am working very hard to win this election and serve our community.

I have also hired a Campaign Manager who has worked on numerous campaigns in our community, including serving as a field organizer for Peter DeFazio’s 2016 campaign.

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What would UAUO’s endorsement mean to you? The endorsement would help demonstrate the value I place on higher education as well as support my strong advocacy for organized labor.

Ryan Moore, Eugene City Council, Ward 8

NAME

Ryan Moore

CANDIDACY
Office
Eugene City Councilor, Ward 8

Candidate comm # or PAC #

19915

Campaign mailing address

1571 Fetters Loop, Eugene, OR 97402

Campaign phone

541-357-7794

Email

ElectRyanMoore@gmail.com

Date received

1/2/2020

HIGHER ED
Please describe your views and position on funding or support for higher education, including, but not limited to, State funding, tuition rates, University accountability, etc.,
As a recent graduate from the UO, and having paid my own way through college by waiting tables, this issue is near and dear to my heart. It is absolutely crucial that our public universities not resort to tuition hikes to recoup increased operating expenses. With current tuition rates, it took me nine years to earn my degree because I could not afford to take a full course load each term; as the cost of tuition continues to rise, that path is put further and further out of reach and students are simultaneously forced to go into more and more debt in order to obtain a degree.

I worked as a Legislative Aide in Salem during the 2019 legislative session and actively advocated for a higher budget appropriation to our public university system. It is crucial that increasing university costs not continue to fall on the backs of students and faculty and I admire UA’s efforts to shine a light on some of the excesses of the administration, such as exorbitant car allowance stipends. Staff cuts and tuition hikes should be the very lastresort, which does not seem to be the current practice.

Please describe your views and position on state transparency, especially in relation to University foundations that (are meant to) serve the interests of the State and its people.

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Charitable contributions can serve an important role in our public university system, especially when public funding becomes unreliable. However, we must be able to ensure that the dollars are actually being used in the interests of all and not just in service of a smaller subset of people. I believe the system we have right now is not transparent enough and that oversight and accountability are overly significant challenges as a direct result. With more specific expenditure information, and especially if it were publicly available, I believe we would have a more just system. This would not only make it easier to ensure accountability, I believe it would also have a positive impact on the behavior of these institutions. Often, the mere knowledge that one is being observed is enough to alter one’s actions.

That said, Eugene City Councilors have a limited ability to make an impact in this realm. One power they do have is the use of their Office as a bully pulpit; as a recent graduate of the UO, I am more than willing to put this power to use in service of students and faculty.

UNION RIGHTS
Do you support the right of employees to collectively bargain?
Absolutely. Collective action is the best counterweight to both corporations and public bureaucracies.

Would you oppose efforts to eliminate or restrict the right of workers and their unions to represent all workers or use payroll-deduction for union dues, including publicly opposing ballot measures?
Absolutely. I have a proven track record of working against anti-labor ballot measure campaigns and for pro-labor measures. From knocking doors in opposition to 2018’s Measure 103 (a backdoor attempt to prevent corporate tax increases) to working as field staff on the Measure 97 campaign in 2016, I have consistently gone to bat for the working class. Opposing efforts to slash union representation or use of payroll deduction would be in complete alignment with my ideals and past activism.

How likely are you to publicly oppose measures, as indicated above, that are deemed to be hostile to organized labor?
I am the son of a mailman and a teacher, both proud union members. I was raised with an inherent appreciation for all that had been won for us through organized labor. The health insurance on which we relied, the livable wages, the ability to have adequate family time, all of this shaped my childhood. Any threat to organized labor is a threat to the working class and I am certain to publicly oppose it.

What are some of the ways you imagine pushing back on the continued effort to weaken Union strength (State legislation following Janus v. AFSCME; attempt to gut LERC; etc.,)?
One of the best ways is to continue putting our Democratic supermajority in Salem to use. For example, we passed HB 2016 during the 2019 legislative session; this bill helps unions cope with the Janus decision by modifying the legal mechanics of how union dues may be collected,

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among other things. However, the Oregon School Board Association actively lobbied against this bill and this was a perfect demonstration of the need for pro-labor elected officials at every level of government. A pro-labor OSBA would have meant one less organization and one less powerful lobbyist working against the bill. The fight is not only at the state level, but all over Oregon and LERC is another great example of this need.

Another way to fortify union strength is to look at items that are frequently on the table during bargaining and turn them into guarantees. Single-payer healthcare would perfectly illustrate this. Instead of health insurance being something that required union capital to secure in each contract, it would be taken off the bargaining table and free up the union to push for other items.

Ultimately, we need more elected officials who openly prioritize labor and working class interests and who can be counted on to do more than just talk.

LOCAL ISSUES
What is your position (and any plans) on addressing the Eugene/Springfield housing situation?
The housing crisis is at the core of why I decided to run for Eugene City Council. My partner and I were forced out of our home of several years because we could no longer afford the ever-rising rent. We searched, and we searched, and we searched, but there was just nothing available for us to move into. As the clock ticked down towards our move-out date and as we grew more and more desperate, we began chipping away at the list of basic amenities we desired in our next home. In the end, we were exceptionally lucky to find a beautiful apartment in a great community that we could afford, but many people in that situation are not so lucky. When we look at Eugene’s unhoused population and where they came from, they were predominantly local renters, like me and my partner, who were forced out of their homes.

I believe there is no better advocate for a community or issue than someone who has personally lived it. None of our current City Councilors, nor anyone else running for the Ward 8 seat, have an intimate perspective of the housing crisis; to them, it is more an academic question than a lived experience and they do not seem to feel the same level of urgency that comes from living through such an ordeal. I believe this has been a major factor in our failure to tackle the crisis and in the Council repeatedly kicking the ball down the road on things like accessory dwelling units, zoning reform, and modification of the city’s fee structure (to name but a few.) If Council’s decisions and actions on housing were placed on a spectrum of cautious versus urgent, they would very clearly skew towards cautious.

I am running for City Council to bring a sense of urgency to the table and to pick up the pace on implementing solutions. In my view, our current decision-makers are often paralyzed by a misguided desire for perfection and are overly risk-averse. I am someone who is comfortable pushing for urgent, progressive changes even when it means we might make a few mistakes along the way. No plan is perfect, but many plans can be made into iterative processes that can be tuned up as we move forward. I will not let the perfect be the enemy of the good.

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A few specific housing solutions that I would love to discuss in further detail if granted an endorsement interview:

  • ●  Make it easier to build by:

    • ○  reducing/waiving system development charges and other development fees for

      ADUs and certain forms of low-income and middle housing

    • ○  removing parking requirements for new construction in certain zones

    • ○  lowering the minimum lot size for permissible accessory dwelling units

    • ○  reviewing and possibly altering time-intensive approval processes for new

      construction

  • ●  Make it easier to be housed by:

    • ○  creating/increasing tenant supports like rent assistance, housing code compliance inspectors, consolidated rental application systems

    • ○  regulating entities that subtract units from our local housing stock such as short-term rentals and real estate speculators

    • ○  altering MUPTE criteria to incentivize housing for lower income levels

    • ○  building awareness (and possibly incentivizing construction) of less conventional

      housing types like single-room-occupancy complexes and quadplexes, especially along major transit corridors

      Our area has seen an uptick in “hate crimes” and related activities. How would you work towards addressing these issues?
      This issue, too, is personal for me. I have been called derogatory slurs in the middle of the UO campus, of all places. During the last budget cycle I was proud to work with members of the Eugene Human Rights Commission, in partnership with Councilor Yeh, to create and fund a new “Multicultural Liaison” staff position in city government. We faced determined opposition from multiple other City Councilors but, in the end, we won out. This position is intended to establish a system of proactive outreach to local marginalized communities and to give them more of a voice in Eugene’s decision-making processes. As white supremacist and fascist groups ramp up their organizing in our area, the creation of this position is very timely.

      The Eugene Human Rights Commission has conducted extensive community research and focus groups to build a list of priorities; the Multicultural Liaison was one item on the list, and the next is a multicultural center. I believe it is important to step back and listen when marginalized communities use their voice and to not insert or override them with my own perspective. In this case, the Human Rights Commission did an excellent job of gathering input and I plan to help push for the priorities they laid out.

      Aside from bureaucratic roles, I believe that City Councilors also have symbolic roles as community leaders. I see it as part of their responsibility to be present and represent our values when out in the community. For example, when the Proud Boys held one of their rallies at a local overpass back in May, I showed up to the peaceful counter-protest across the street. It was disappointing that only one elected official was there with us and that he wasn’t even from

Eugene. I saw this as a missed opportunity for our elected leaders to walk the walk and viscerally demonstrate our values. More recently, Council struggled to pass a toothless resolution denouncing white supremacy and ultimately had to approve a watered-down version. As an activist, I live by my principles and I will continue to do so as a City Councilor.

How do you plan on addressing issues around poverty and homelessness in our area?

The TAC Report lays out ten detailed strategies for the city and county to address homelessness; if the strategies were followed to a tee, the report asserts that we could have no permanent unsheltered population in as few as three years. From my position on the Budget Committee, in multiple newspaper articles, and in my activism I have consistently argued for an increased commitment to these strategies but it has been an uphill battle. During the last round of budget talks I put forward a motion to fund the very beginning stages of these strategies, but the motion failed. Several months later, Council brought the same motion back with the same exact funding levels I had determined and they passed it as a package with a few other components. To me, this is a perfect example of the lack of urgency that has consistently been exhibited by Council and I cannot help but wonder how much more we would have accomplished before winter settled in if we had just moved those few months faster. As a millennial, as a renter, and as someone who has spent much of his adult life living paycheck to paycheck, this struggle is real to me and I believe I bring a level of commitment that is not currently present on Council.

CAMPAIGN QUESTIONS
Are there choices or decisions you have made in the past that we should be aware of in making our recommendation to support your candidacy?

I do not believe I have made any decisions that would negatively impact your willingness to endorse. There are several positive choices and decisions I made, such as actively campaigning against recent anti-labor ballot measures and for pro-labor ballot measures. I was also working to resolve the housing crisis long before I ever thought about running for office; I Co-founded the Springfield-Eugene Tenant Association to advocate on behalf of renters and to help them keep their homes. Again, I am a person of action and I believe my record speaks for itself.

What are your three primary goals while serving in this position, both short term and longer term?

My three primary goals are to work on resolving the homeslessness and housing crises, mitigating Eugene’s impact on the climate, and restoring trust and faith in city government.

Housing: Instead of focusing on criminalizing unhoused people, I believe we need to engage with those who want help and create pathways to restoration that enable more folks to find their ways back into housing. Having worked in the criminal justice system, I know that fining and jailing hurts not only unhoused people, but also housed people as taxpayers pay for the

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unending focus on criminalizing people who are destitute. In my role on the city’s Budget Committee I have actively pushed for increased funding and support of the TAC Report strategiesand a major factor in my decision to run for City Council was the reluctance of our current Councilors to take meaningful action.

Climate Action: We are running out of time to take action on climate change. With approximately ten years left until our climate fate is sealed, the City of Eugene can no longer drag its feet on solutions. Our local activist community has been pushing for accountability and recently won some important concessions, but there is still a long road ahead before we have a Climate Action Plan that will ensure we meet our carbon reduction goals. If elected, I will be the youngest person on Council by more than a decade and I will be more than two decades younger than the average age of our current Councilors; I believe climate change will have a direct and tangible bearing on my future and this perspective certainly impacts the policies for which I am willing to push.

Trust in Government: At this time, more and more people are showing a lack of trust in city government and that their voices are not being heard. I believe this can be turned around with hard work, accessible and open representation, and honest communication. If elected, I intend to put more effort into sincerely engaging with constituents and seeking input from folks that may not have the luxury of being able to show up and testify at a City Council meeting every other Monday evening. I believe our current Council is only hearing input from certain segments of the population and that this skews the decision-making process. Door-knocking outside of election season, regular coffee chats, and town halls and listening sessions in our actual neighborhoods are all tactics I plan to use to reach often-unheard voices.

How will those goals and your plans while in office benefit Higher Ed organized labor as well as the students we serve?
An increased commitment to solving the housing crisis will benefit everyone, but I believe it will provide disproportionate benefits to students and faculty who tend to be on the front lines of the crisis. Our perspectives are not currently represented on the Eugene City Council and this lack of representation has played out over and over in the votes that they take. From essentially banning accessory dwelling units, to outlawing single-room-occupancy development, to maintaining exclusionary zoning, there is a whole host of opportunities for us to make it easier to be housed and to build housing— we just need the commitment to make it happen.

Why did you decide to run for this position?

As I mentioned above, my partner and I were forced out of our last home because of the ever-rising cost of rent. We know well that feeling of fear and desperation that comes when someone is forced to move in the current market and we fully appreciate how lucky we were that it worked out for us, but I know that many others are not so lucky. None of our current City Councilors have gone through this experience. If anything, the housing crisis is academic to them and while they may be sympathetic, they cannot fully understand how those affected by the crisis truly feel or the endless struggles we face. I have done what I can from the Budget

Committee and through our work at the Springfield-Eugene Tenant Association but I have come to the realization that we just need more leverage in this fight. And so, here I am.

What other organizations are supporting your candidacy?

I am honored to have received the endorsements of: 350 Eugene Climate Emergency PAC, Run For Something, the Eugene Association of Realtors, and Teamsters JointCouncil No. 37. I have also received a slew of individual endorsements including Kitty Piercy, Pete Sorenson, Jennifer Yeh, Rob Zako, and many more.

What is your plan to win your election?

I have been reaching out to the people and I know that direct voter contact is our path to victory. Canvassing is certainly the backbone of our campaign. I also tend to perform well in debates, forums, and other public events and we are working to maximize these opportunities. Finally, we are making effective use of social media to keep a day to day communication dynamic open between the voters and our campaign. We have calculated our win number to be 4,203 votes and our targeting will get us there with room to spare.

What would UAUO’s endorsement mean to you?

Organized labor in all forms is our best remaining bulwark against total corporatocracy. As a Field Organizer for the Yes on 97 campaign in 2016, and in much of my activism, I have been on the front lines of this fight. Our campaign is all about standing up for the working class and a core piece of that is that I am the only candidate in Ward 8 that is actually a member ofthe working class. UA’s endorsement would further legitimize and reaffirm my argument that the priorities and perspectives we have laid out in our campaign are in the right place.

Joel Iboa, Lane County Commissioner, Seat 3

NAME: Joel Iboa
CANDIDACY: Lane County Commissioner, South Eugene, District 3
Office
Candidate comm # or PAC #
20156
Campaign mailing address : PO Box 71171, Springfield, OR 97475 Campaign phone: 541-285-4647
Email: iboa4southeugene@gmail.com
Date received: 2/26/2020

HIGHER ED

Please describe your views and position on funding or support for higher education, including, but not limited to, State funding, tuition rates, University accountability, etc.,

There has been a consistent decrease in support from the Federal and the State Government for public universities. Over the last few decades, our public universities have operated more like corporations rather than places for individuals to get a quality education. Tuition rates continue to increase every year, making it harder for students to stay in school. The University of Oregon has also recently made significant cuts in departments that provide students with opportunities. They have also made it harder for teachers to do their job because they are having to think about health insurance, work benefits, and meager wages. All the while, the athletic departments and the football program are fully funded. The University of Oregon should be held accountable to its students and to its staff that make it run, not to the board of trustees or Nike. Additionally, Oregon State Legislature and the Federal Government have a responsibility to increase their support for our public universities.

Please describe your views and position on state transparency, especially in relation to University foundations that (are meant to) serve the interests of the State and its people.

When the State Government spends money, tax payers deserve to know where the money is being allocated as they are the ones generating it. University foundations are meant to serve the interests of the state and its people. If elected as County Commissioner for District 3, it would be my responsibility to ensure that students and the people that reside in the State of Oregon understand and know where their tax dollars are being spent. State transparency is also important to make sure that the money utilized goes towards students receiving a quality and affordable education.

UNION RIGHTS

Do you support the right of employees to collectively bargain?

Absolutely! When employers are being unreasonable, employees are best positioned to

have their needs met when they come together and decide for themselves what kind of workplace they would like to work in and what kinds of benefits they deserve. There is strength in numbers.

Would you oppose efforts to eliminate or restrict the right of workers and their unions to represent all workers or use payroll-deduction for union dues, including publicly opposing ballot measures?

Yes, I would. I think that these types of tactics are sinister and are used to discourage workers from joining or participating in their unions.

How likely are you to publicly oppose measures, as indicated above, that are deemed to be hostile to organized labor?

I am very likely to publicly oppose ballot measures and would happily give my name as County Commissioner to a list of endorsers. In addition to this, I would provide valuable support. Given the fact that I was a coalition manager for the No on Measure 105 Campaign, protecting Oregon’s 32 year old anti-racial profiling law, my network is wide and vast and I would actively campaign to get them involved to protect organized labor.

What are some of the ways you imagine pushing back on the continued effort to weaken Union strength (State legislation following Janus v. AFSCME; attempt to gut LERC; etc.,)?

Unions across the State and the County need to double down in their efforts to advocate for workers. Janus v AFSCME decision was a major blow to the power of unions and this current effort to gut LERC is another attempt to reduce the functional capacity of unions. As County Commissioner, I would be a strong advocate for the preservation and creation of unions. SEIU has a vision of Unions for Everyone. It is a vision I share. We must ensure current and future elected officials are not only aligned with unions but are champions for them. I am hopeful unions can come back stronger than ever. There are efforts currently in many sectors to create them. Currently, there is good work being done by community/union members and elected officials to stop the attacks on union members, but it is not enough. We need a more diverse pool of advocates and strategies. Last February, I led a campaign against Sheriff Trapp when he was allowing ICE special access to the Lane County Jail. A diverse coalition of immigrants service providers, social justice groups, government officials, activists, and students pushed back through earned media, testimony, and a protest outside of his office that led to his eventual resignation. Going through the courts, legislation, and elected officials is a great tactic but we need to use the other side of the coin as well. Public dissent, protests, and strategic outrage are important tools for change. In the fight for union rights, I am willing to bring all my experience to the table to sustain and grow unions for all.

LOCAL ISSUES

What is your position (and any plans) on addressing the Eugene/Springfield housing situation?

Eugene is running a net deficit on available housing consistently every year. Between short term rental properties, skyrocketing rent, and low incentive for builders, our current housing system is not adapting quickly or effectively to address these concerns.

We need to build up, not out, specifically along tier one traffic corridors throughout the city. By developing along high traffic corridors, we preserve and protect the majority of the existing housing supply, encourage use of public transportation and provide opportunities for mixed use commercial and residential properties. By focusing on multi-unit dwellings, built for a fraction of the cost, and by using a fraction of the space in comparison to lots currently zoned for single occupancy dwellings we can close the housing deficit. If we encourage the development of these multi-occupancy dwellings, we can lower rent, house more individuals in less space and create a diverse array of options for renters throughout our community.

Our area has seen an uptick in “hate crimes” and related activities. How would you work towards addressing these issues?

As the Chair of the Eugene Human Rights Commission, I have first hand knowledge and experience monitoring and addressing hate and biased crimes in our community. I championed and introduced our city’s resolution against White Nationalism and White Supremacy and I’ve fought for our state’s 32 year old sanctuary status. My experience as a coalition builder fighting against legislation targeting marginalized groups and as the only person of color in this race, I am the only candidate qualified and capable of changing hearts and minds regarding hate and bias crimes in our community.

How do you plan on addressing issues around poverty and homelessness in our area?

The issue of poverty and homeless in our community is tragic, but a practical and meaningful coordinated response is long overdue. Between the 2018 TAC Report, and the recently published Prosecution of the Unhoused, by Lane County Legal Aid/Oregon Law Center, the outline for addressing this issue is readily available, but has yet to be effectively implemented in our community.

By a modest investment from our local government to fund the additional hiring of HHS FTE, we could effectively conduct outreach and tracking of unsheltered individuals. By tracking these folks, we could assist these individuals in their transition off the streets and back to contributing to our society.

By creating a low barrier shelter, we could develop the infrastructure to house, treat and identify the needs of unsheltered individuals. By identifying these needs and pairing these individuals with FTE’s from HHS we can create individual treatment and strategic plans to effectively get these folks off the streets.

Currently the Oregon State Legislature is considering a bill that will invest $40 million to create new shelters. This week both the house and senate Republicans walked out of the capitol, effectively stopping several important bills, including this one. If they do not come back it will not pass and we will be forced to come back to it in the 2021 session. As County Commissioner, I would advocate for this funding to pass.

CAMPAIGN QUESTIONS

Are there choices or decisions you have made in the past that we should be aware of in making our recommendation to support your candidacy?

I have consistently advocated and championed groundbreaking and innovative solutions to environmental, social, and human rights issues. I started doing so in highschool when I was addressing the achievement gap between white students and students of color at the age of 15. In college, I was part of both MEChA and the Coalition Against Environmental Racism. We actively campaigned against the “Show Me Your Papers” law in Arizona and to address environmental racism locally and nationally. Since I graduated college in 2014, I have accomplished many advancements in environmental justice, human rights and immigrant rights.

What are your three primary goals while serving in this position, both short term and longer term?

In the short term, I want to address affordable housing, homelessness and safety in our communities.

In the long term, I would like to create a real climate action plan, develop a segment of our economy that isn’t beholden to extraction based endeavours, and continue to ensure Lane County’s budget is balanced to ensure prosperity, inclusivity and support of all its residents.

How will those goals and your plans while in office benefit Higher Ed organized labor as well as the students we serve?

People in Higher Ed and students will most certainly benefit from safer communities. There has been a significant increase in hate and bias activity on campus that is preventing people from feeling safe. Additionally, given the alarmingly increasing cost of attendance for students along with the Higher Ed labor wages, these individuals deserve access to higher quality affordable housing.

Why did you decide to run for this position?

I was raised in the Whiteaker neighborhood of Eugene, OR, home to primarily working-class residents. On May 29, 1995, the Eugene Register Guard reported Whiteaker Elementary as one of the most economically disadvantaged schools in Oregon, with an influx of poor and Hispanic illiterate students. Many students came from homeless families; 97% fell below state and federal poverty guidelines. My parents moved into the apartment complex across the street from this elementary school in 1995. Whiteaker was a blighted area with a high violent crime rate when our family lived there. I recall walking to the park with my younger sister, and our mother reminding us to be careful of the needles in the sandbox. Living next to the highway, we experienced harsh levels of air pollution; in fact, my younger brother was born with asthma. Given these experiences, I know first hand the struggles everyday families face in South Eugene and Lane County. I hope to address affordable housing and public safety and also aim to cultivate a regenerative economy county-wide, with environmental and social benefits for present and future generations. With the current Federal and State inaction, it is now more important than ever that Lane County remains a beacon of hope. I have been fighting for his hometown my entire life, and this election will help bring the necessary energy to build a thriving future for all.

What other organizations are supporting your candidacy?

Democratic Party of Lane County NAROL Pro-Choice

What is your plan to win your election?

I plan to win my election by tapping into the grassroots culture of our community. By building strong ties with community organizations, labor unions, a diverse and creative UO and the general public at large, we can activate a network of voters and volunteers that will help propel our county into a brighter future. As a young person of color, I mirror the experience of folks who have never participated in politics as a whole. Our campaign aims to bring these folks in and create a more educated, energetic and participatory electorate.

We plan to raise at least $80,000, knock on every door in district 3 and register as many individuals as possible to turn out and vote, not just for county commissioner, but for every ticket on the ballot. We want to encourage folks to learn more about the people representing them in local, state and federal government and allow them to truly own their vote.

What would UAUO’s endorsement mean to you?

As a graduate of the University of Oregon and as a lifelong duck, the support and endorsement of the people who inspired me to become the leader I am today would be a testament to your organization’s influence as educators. If it hadn’t been for the professors, GTFs and other staff at the university, I doubt I would have accomplished what I have up to this point. Your support would send a strong message to current and future students that with the proper guidance, they too can help make their community a better place.

Leonard Stoehr, Springfield City Council, Ward 4

NAME – Leonard Stoehr
CANDIDACY – Incumbent – Running for re-election Office – Springfield Ward 4

Candidate comm # or PAC # – Leonard for Springfield (#17809) Campaign mailing address: 816 S 72nd St Springfield, OR 97478

Campaign phone (541) 285-3792 – Leonard 503-927-8189 – kevin, campaign manager Email – leonard.stoehr@teamsterslocal206.orgor kevin.croninor@gmail.com
Date received

HIGHER ED
Please describe your views and position on funding or support for higher education, including, but not limited to, State funding, tuition rates, University accountability, etc.,

I am a strong supporter of funding our state universities and community colleges. We’ve seen an ever shrinking slice of universities budgets come from state resources. Our state’s corporate tax rate is one of the smallest in the country. We shouldn’t balance our public universities budgets on the backs of workers and students when large corporations aren’t paying their fair share.

Please describe your views and position on state transparency, especially in relation to University foundations that (are meant to) serve the interests of the State and its people.

One of the issues that concerns me is Oregon’s public institutions have widely differing fees for public records requests. In a 2019 article in the Oregonian, Ginger McCall, Oregon public records advocate called on lawmakers to reduce fees for public records requests. I agree with that. It is my understanding that some of your members have had trouble with records requests to the university.

I believe that university foundations should disclose who their donors are because they wield an incredible amount of power on campus. Decisions affecting public institutions should be made in public meetings and hearings, not in secret meetings with influential donors.

UNION RIGHTS

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Do you support the right of employees to collectively bargain?

Yes. As a union rep for Teamster’s local 206, I bargain a number of contracts. I’m a union man through and through.

Would you oppose efforts to eliminate or restrict the right of workers and their unions to represent all workers or use payroll-deduction for union dues, including publicly opposing ballot measures?

Absolutely. I’m ready to stand with you against all attacks on worker’s ability to organize.

How likely are you to publicly oppose measures, as indicated above, that are deemed to be hostile to organized labor?

Very likely. I’m not shy about standing up for working people.

What are some of the ways you imagine pushing back on the continued effort to
weaken Union strength (State legislation following Janus v. AFSCME; attempt to gut
LERC; etc.,)?
I am very supportive of H.R.2474 – Protecting the Right to Organize Act of 2019, which is currently languishing in committee in the U.S. Senate. As a leader in my community I’ve been very supportive of LERC and helping workers to organize.

LOCAL ISSUES
What is your position (and any plans) on addressing the Eugene/Springfield housing
Situation?
I believe there needs to be a multi-faceted approach to address the housing crisis. I’m proud that Springfield has a strong track record in allowing the construction of accessory dwelling units and has done its part in “green lighting” multi-unit housing. Springfield needs to participate in the intergovernmental housing policy board with Lane County and the City of Eugene. I’ve voted against the rezoning of patrician mobile home park, an action that is forcing nearly a hundred folks out of their homes, to date this is the single most egregious action that the city council has taken during my tenure. I would like Springfield to adopt additional renter protections, a housing policy code, encourage new multi-family housing, and explore a construction excise tax dedicated to affordable housing. With the passage of Measure 102, Springfield now has the ability to partner with a local non-profit that has been awarded LIHTC credits from the State and can ask voters for a bond to construct those units. I applaud our local Housing Authority, Homes for Good, for their construction of MLK commons, the first “housing first” project in the community which is also supportive housing. I’m excited about the possibility of a state rent assistance program HB4002, both for one-time-use funds to curb evictions, and on-going assistance to help those on low incomes, my goal is to have Springfield well positioned to make

the most of those opportunities. No single approach will alleviate the housing crisis and we need to be all hands on deck to help.

Our area has seen an uptick in “hate crimes” and related activities. How would you work towards addressing these issues?
Springfield is the home of the infamous Jimmy Marr, a neo-nazi that has been actively organizing in this area. This is a problem we need to take seriously. One of the reasons we’ve seen an uptick in “hate crimes” is because very few cities actually have a mechanism to record such activity and track it. Eugene has led the way with the creation of a human rights commission and I believe Springfield should follow their lead. We need to do more to hire people of color at Springfield PD, and have a police force that represents the community they serve. I believe we should prosecute and investigate hate crimes.

How do you plan on addressing issues around poverty and homelessness in our area?

Homelessness is directly connected to the larger housing crisis. Most of the folks who are homeless in this area are workers who were formerly renters and were no-cause evicted or priced out of the current market. The first thing we need to do is be proactive in stopping evictions from happening in the first place. I’m excited that the Oregon legislature is considering additional funding for legal aid services, which is the front line for eviction prevention in this area. Additionally, the legislature is considering an additional $63 million in funding for behavioral health services. I applaud that, and hope to work with lane county to house behavioral health services in Springfield. Furthermore, Springfield needs to do it’s part to implement the TAC report, and I believe that we can specifically help by asking the voters for bond funding to build a low barrier shelter in Springfield. According to the intergovernmental housing policy board, Lane County has a deficit of 13,500 affordable housing units, it is our duty to champion the construction of new housing units wherever possible.

CAMPAIGN QUESTIONS
Are there choices or decisions you have made in the past that we should be aware of in making our recommendation to support your candidacy?

I’ve made it my business to fight for the public interest and stand up for workers. I’m not hiding anything.

What are your three primary goals while serving in this position, both short term and longer term?

First, to stop the destruction of existing low-income housing by developers in Springfield. The ideal is to create enough housing for everyone. By making it impossible for young workers to live here, we eat our own seed corn.

Second, to roll up the welcome mat for corporations who line up to use our labor and resources on the public dime. By handing international conglomerates a blank check in the form of tax breaks, we create a playing field that tilts away from our small and local businesses.

Third, to work with the school board to improve our schools by reducing class size and hiring more teachers.

How will those goals and your plans while in office benefit Higher Ed organized labor as well as the students we serve?

By reducing corporate raids, we better the odds of good jobs that will stay in Springfield and not disappear at the end of the tax waivers.

By building new housing, we make Springfield more affordable for students and academics who would otherwise have to commute unsustainable distances.

By improving our schools, we increase the flow of educated students to the University system.

Why did you decide to run for this position?

I was recruited to run for this position four years ago by Julie Fahey and members of the LatinX community. I ran against Dave Ralston, a notorious racist on the council. With the encouragement of friends, I’ve decided to seek another term.

What other organizations are supporting your candidacy?

I’m supported by Joint Council of Teamsters No. 37, the Democratic Party of Lane County and the Lane Central Labor Chapter, AFL-CIO. I’m seeking the endorsements of other Labor groups and environmental non-profits and I’m in process with each of them at the time of this writing.

What is your plan to win your election?

I’m running a grassroots, people-powered campaign. We’re raising money to send a few mailers, we will be in the voters pamphlet, my campaign manager will help me spend money wisely to maximize advertising dollars. Primarily, we are going door to door to build a working class movement for change in Springfield.

What would UAUO’s endorsement mean to you?

I would be very proud to have the smart and talented folks at the university of Oregon supporting my campaign. I believe it sends a signal to the voters that I stand on the side of reason, and the faculty believes me to be a vehicle for positive change in Springfield.

Ballot Measures

Legislative Sessions

2020 Oregon Legislative Session

The short session kicked off this week and will be all wrapped up in early March. Given that next year’s focus will heavily center on higher education, there are some higher ed bills already in the works; bills cleaning up the K-12 legislation from last year; lots of committees and task forces to learn about stuff; some tax and revenue housecleaning; and even some diversity-related initiatives. Nothing on PERS (unless you’re a prison chaplain, then hit me up); if you’d like updates on the PERS legislation lawsuit, hit me up as well. And if you’d like to see a complete list of potential bills or like to see AAUP’s position on the Bills they’re taking on, you can email me at tiwari@uauoregon.org.

Here are some highlights:

EDUCATION:

HB4055

Sets up a task force to give recommendations on how to address student housing and food insecurity.

HB4057 (Revenue)

Prohibits sports betting on college teams. Eh…don’t know about this one. AAUP is currently neutral on this, and I’d love to hear from folks what y’all think…

HB4099

Students from the Republic of Palau, Republic of the Marshall Islands or Federated States of Micronesia can receive in-state tuition.

HB4128

This House-sponsored Bill attempts to help students reach graduation quickly by making sure they are placed in appropriate lower-division Writing and Math courses. However, the initial Bill does not include faculty in thinking through assessment. Both the Universities and Labor are pushing for drastic amendments, if not an outright death. I think this is an issue (placement and assessment), but not something that should be legislated. However, drawing attention to the issue brings up other things worth thinking about in the legislature, like having enough student support services for students coming from K-12 institutions that did not adequately prepare them for entry into higher-ed (funding).

HB4137

Authorizes all Us to offer PhDs, some Us (regionals) limited to a number of programs for an initial time period. Prohibits HECC or other state agencies from giving scholarship money to students going to predatory on-line “schools.”

HB4160

This Bill from Representative Alonso León is ultimately a “listening bill” whereby a legislative task force will visit the Us and CCs in order to learn how best to serve students from under-represented communities writ large. This is a great place for the issues raised in 4128 to be taken up, rather than go right to legislation.

SB1501

Here we see a repeat of the California bill meant to give student athletes a shot at earning some income. If passed without some serious amendments there’s plenty of time for the NCAA and its partners to squash it.

SB1521

This is a typical short-session bill that does some cleaning up on previously passed legislation, this time, the Transfer Student Bill of Rights and Responsibilities. We’re keeping an eye on this, especially to make sure that the HECC doesn’t go too far around the Us. There’s a provision for extending some scholarships for Public Safety Officer’s children thrown in as well as an authorization for the regional Us (Western, Eastern, and Southern) to offer PhD degrees (like HB4137).

SB1540

Stricter licensing process and penalties for student loan companies.

SB1544

A short one from HECC meant to protect Veterans from predatory career schools that go after a loophole in benefits coverage. The bill sets standards for tuition revenue and penalties for fucking with Vets.

LABOR:

HB4007

Protects workers who are unemployed because of an active labor dispute from not receiving unemployment insurance benefits.

HB4094 (K-12)

School Districts would have to use “class size” and “caseloads” as mandatory collective bargaining subjects.

HB4146 (health-care; higher-ed)

This is the final push for the part-time faculty healthcare bill that didn’t quite make it through last year. [link to PDF]

Other notable bills to keep an eye on:

SB1574

Now presented as the Greenhouse Gas Bill, here’s an attempt to tackle the Clean Air Bill from last year that forced a Republican walkout and a near shutdown of the legislative session. Some Dems are pissed that this Bill isn’t as “strong” as last year, though some Republicans have offered some support while other Rs are jumping on the “won’t do anything anyway” bandwagon. And…to head off the potential one-sided shutdown from last session…

SJR201

…here’s a proposal to go from a 2/3 majority to simple majority for quorum. AAUP and Labor/Dems will strongly support.

HOUSING:

HBs 4001, 4002, 4015 are task force/study bills while HB4003 hopes to provide “technical assistance” and “grants” to organizations working on increasing home ownership for people of color, including making “funds available to federally recognized Indian tribes,” implicit bias training for mortgage lenders, and a task force on racial disparity in home ownership.  HB4039 specially addresses homeless youth populations.

Miscellaneous

HB4076, specifically with the loudest commentators on UOM in mind, sets up a task force on age discrimination.

HB4096 looks to increase funds to childcare centers serving large employees, however, also makes it possible that “all residential structures” can get certified for childcare.

HB4126 makes it easier to arrest antifa protestors.

Political Action Fund

United Academics works with our affiliate, AFT-Oregon, to handle political donations our members want to make. AFT-Oregon is a member-run union and the candidates and causes they support are selected by elected committee members.

What is the Political Action Fund?

AFT-Oregon’s Political Action Fund (PAF) is part of the political action arm of AFT-Oregon. It builds our union’s power and makes sure we have a strong voice to advocate for educators and educational professionals, and our communities.

PAF makes politics work for educators and working families by:

  • Funding member outreach to lawmakers to educate them on important issues that affect our union and communities
  • Helping to elect and re-elect lawmakers who support us
  • Mobilizing and empowering members to build a strong voice for workers and education in Oregon
  • Organizing community actions with allies to demand full funding for schools, community colleges, and universities, and fighting back against public policy that harms working Oregonians
  • Passing pro-worker and pro-education legislation to protect our jobs and raise workplace standards
  • Fighting anti-union legislation and ballot measures

Why Political Action?

As workers and educators, AFT-Oregon members fight for fair wages and benefits, respect on the job, and an education system that lifts up our whole community. Education policy and funding is decided by our legislators and on the ballot. This directly impacts what we can get at the bargaining table and the quality of our students’ education.

Anti-worker and anti-public education corporate forces have deep pockets to push their agendas on working Oregonians. If everyone steps up and contributes what they can, together we have the power to ensure a voice at the table.

How it works:

  • PAF is entirely funded by voluntary contributions and is guided by a member-based, democratic process.
  • In Oregon, you can receive a tax credit up to $50 for a single filer and $100 for a joint filer on your Oregon State Taxes.

If you are interested in contributing to the Political Action Fund, contact the office so we can get you a PAF card.

Register to Vote

In most cases, you can register to vote by filling out an online form. You can also download, fill out, and mail in a paper form

Allies on Campus

SEIU

72,000 people. 500 different job descriptions. In every corner of the state, we care for Oregon.

GTFF

The labor union representing over 1,500 Graduate Teaching Fellows and Research Assistants at the University of Oregon.

Community Organizations We Like

Eugene has many outstanding community services, charities and organizations that help people in need. If you need a helping hand, or would like to extend one, please look into the following organizations.

Sexual Assault Support Services

Providing community education, outreach, advocacy and support to survivors of sexual violence and their families.

Womenspace

Womenspace has been providing safety, hope, and healing to survivors of intimate partner violence for over 40 years.

Eugene Springfield NAACP

The mission of the NAACP is to ensure the political, educational, social, and economic equality of rights of all persons and to eliminate race-based discrimination.

White Bird Clinic

White Bird Clinic provides compassionate, humanistic healthcare, and supportive services to individuals in our community, so everyone receives the care they need.

HIV Alliance

Support for individuals living with HIV/AIDS and prevent new HIV infections.

Food For Lane County

Food for Lane County is dedicated to reducing hunger by engaging our community to create access to food.

Trans*Ponder

Trans*ponder provides support, resources, and education for the trans/gender diverse community and its allies.

Volunteers in Medicine

Volunteers In Medicine is a primary care medical clinic for low-income, underserved adults and their households in Lane County who can’t afford health care coverage.

Centro Latino Americano

Centro Latino Americano is a bilingual, multicultural agency that serves Latino families in Lane County.

Our National & State Affiliates

When you're a member of United Academics you are also a member of the American Federation of Teachers and the American Association of University Professors. Both come with membership benefits, but perhaps the best benefit is knowing that you are part of a union family literally millions strong!

American Federation of Teachers

AFT represents 1.6 million members across the United States.

AFT-Oregon

AFT-Oregon is the state affiliate of AFT. AFT-OR represents more than 12,000 workers statewide.

The American Association of University Professors

The AAUP was founded in 1918 to defend academic freedom.

AAUP-Oregon

AAUP-Oregon has members at UO, OSU, PSU, EOU, OIT, Marylhurst, and Linfield.

American Federation of Labor – Congress of Industrial Organizations

The AFL-CIO is the umbrella organization for 56 national and international unions.

Oregon AFL-CIO

The state affiliate of the AFL-CIO.